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Opinion Pieces

Political correctness; why language matters

Political correctness; why language matters

'Whatever you say, someone will be offended by it.’ More and more people are sick of the pressure to be politically correct. But our words matter. Why is it important to be politically correct?
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Do we have a responsibility to change the world?

Do we have a responsibility to change the world?

While some people feel very much responsible for their impact on the world's social and environmental state, others seem not to think about this at all. Do we have people a responsibility to make the world a better place?
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Reappropriating the term ‘bitch’

Reappropriating the term ‘bitch’

Why is the word ‘bitch’ interpreted as such a hurtful insult and how does it contribute to the conditioning of women? Shouldn't women reappropriate the term, and turn it into a compliment?
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News as a propaganda tool: good for no one 

News as a propaganda tool: good for no one 

From radio and analog television to social media, the Internet, and online newspapers. Elisa Rossetti examines how news has changed over the years, and the role it now plays in right-wing populism.
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Opinion Pieces

Photo by Miguel Henriques on Unsplash

Political correctness; why language matters

'Whatever you say, someone will be offended by it.’ More and more people are sick of the pressure to be politically correct. But our words matter. Why is it important to be politically correct?

Do we have a responsibility to change the world?

While some people feel very much responsible for their impact on the world's social and environmental state, others seem not to think about this at all. Do we have people a responsibility to make the world a better place?

Reappropriating the term ‘bitch’

Why is the word ‘bitch’ interpreted as such a hurtful insult and how does it contribute to the conditioning of women? Shouldn't women reappropriate the term, and turn it into a compliment?

News as a propaganda tool: good for no one 

From radio and analog television to social media, the Internet, and online newspapers. Elisa Rossetti examines how news has changed over the years, and the role it now plays in right-wing populism.